All demos

Lore - Walrus Audio

Jul 05 2022
Sorry, your browser sucks ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
walrus audio lore
<div style="display: flex; justify-content: center;"><iframe src="/demos/walrus-audio-lore?embed=1&height=630" title="Lore - Walrus Audio | Loopy Demos" style="border-radius:16px" width="400" height="630" frameborder="0"></iframe></div>

To embed this demo on your own website, copy & paste the code above. Or customize your demo widget here.

Walrus Audio have given the Lore a bold tag line: Reverse Soundscape Generator. And I think they're delivering on what that title promises.

The Lore has 5 different programs that combine different types of reverse delay and reverb, forward reverb, octave up and down reverbs as well as pitch delays feeding into each other.

This is not a reverb/delay for subtleties or for emulating some vintage analog tone. The Lore is for creating ambient textures, kind of like a mysterious orchestra that plays somewhere far away.

I'm usually not the biggest fan of secondary functions for knobs. I like to just fiddle with knobs and find sounds that inspire me to play. But the Lore does exactly that. Sure, for creating an explicit demo, I had to look stuff up in their manual.

But it's really easy to not care what each knob does exactly and just play around until you have a unique soundscape that you can't explain.

I believe people would ask themselves if there is an overlap between the Lore and the Walrus Audio Slö. I think both can give you similar results if you want modulated reverb with an added octave down. But the similarities end there.

The Lore is infinitely tweakable and its purpose is sound exploration. The Slö can be used much more "surgical" by dialing in the exact amount of octave down/modulation/decay tone. Plus it has the infinite sustain feature for creating pads. They're both tools for different applications and it makes sense to have both if you're into ambient stuff.

I couldn't be happier with the Lore. It's exactly the kind of ambient tool that was missing in my setup :)

Recording Notes

Main Guitar

Due to the normalization that happens when you export a track in GarageBand, you will notice that some sounds where the mix is higher on the Lore, especially with octave down reverb/delay sounds, the dry signal gets quieter.

For my demos, I export the backing track and the guitar sounds affected by the pedal in the demo separately. In a proper mix, we could have more control over this. We could make the delay/reverb drown out the whole mix for a dramatic effect or turn down the mix to tuck nicely under the mix for a more subtle ambient texture.

Lead Guitar

  • K'mo Memphis Std., classic T-style pickups (both pickups) and my sloppy tremolo picking which I need to practice more
  • Mask Audio Electronics Black Math Fuzz
  • SS/BS Mini (same medium gain setting as main guitar)
  • Lore (always same setting as the main guitar)
  • Iridium
  • Panned slightly to the right

Bass

  • Fender JMJ Mustang Bass, tone 100% up, played with pick
  • SS/BS Mini, medium gain with bass maxed out
  • Iridium with bass cab IRs, a little bit more gain to stack with the mini and a bit more room reverb to make it sit in a more reverby mix
  • Compression and EQing in the DAW (just a bumb around 100 Hz, scooping the low mids a little and slight bumb around 2 kHz)

Drums

  • GarageBand drummer Gavin (indie rock) on the Brooklyn kit
  • Snare and kick treated with GarageBand RAT-style distortion plugin
  • Some EQing to make the whole kit a little brighter and increased master reverb

The whole track was "mastered" with some compression, exciter and limiter.

Links

Some of these are affiliate links and I earn a small comission if you buy stuff through those links. There is no additional cost for you. It helps me keep this website alive.

If you like what I do, buy me a beer 🍺.

Related Demos